Home > Custom Motorcycle Gallery > 1997 FLSTF



Typically speaking, the "Fatboy" has long been regarded as one of the most popular styles of big twin Harley Davidson since it was introduced in 1990. Reminiscent of the stripped down FLH of the fifties, it is low and no nonsense, built for ripping' around on and looking cool. This "Fatboy" in particular is a shining example of the modern day boulevard cruiser. It has been adorned with many subtle covers, cables, and chroming that will make it stand out in a crowd.

According to the information available at the time of the evaluation, which was received from Bill Lam at Zippers performance (410-579-2828), the engine within this frame "could" be one of their 113" BIG BILLET engines which was very popular in 2000 (the time the engine cases were sold to them by S&S Performance). The tell tale signs being the C.N.C machined solid billet heads complete with the compression release valves. Though the displacement has not been confirmed, it is not out of the question considering the presence of the Carlini Torque Arm, which is an expensive enough part that it would not be used unless it was necessary to fortify the rigidity of the driveline. Other high performance parts like the Mikuni carb, Crane ignition, and the Vance & Hines "Pro Pipe" indicate that this bike is capable of ripping through the checkered flag as indicated in the air brushed custom paint scheme.

In addition to the new engine, this machine has undergone an almost complete cosmetic make over. As a competitor in a show & shine, it would be considered a modified custom, though still registered as a Harley Davidson, it is made up of about fifty five percent performance and non stock components. Lavish chroming on the wheels and both the front and rear forks, as well as many components in between, a new one piece stretched fuel tank, pull back handle bars with fully chromed accessories, including a tachometer, a Lepera Silhouette seat, chromed billet forward controls with matching passenger pegs, and all upgraded lighting and braking components. Little was left untouched on this bike.

The notion that buying a Harley as an investment has become a point of argument among many owners. Seldom does one purchase a bike these days and get a deal good enough that he can capitalize on it down the road, especially with newer bikes. The "older" bikes that have been customized by someone else however pose a different situation. To duplicate this machine today as it is presented, would cost significantly more than to buy one already "done". The appraised value is not intended to account for the full investment into the machine to arrive at the finished product, but is intended to reflect what could be considered a reasonable market value for a machine of this caliber.

Home > Custom Motorcycle Gallery > 1997 FLSTF